CTP-1 Crisis Response

  1. Provide both an objective (from a source e.g. dictionary, textbook) and subjective definition (in your own words) for the following terms: “crisis” and “precipitating event.” (minimum 50 words each, excluding the objective definitions)

According to Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary a crisis is “a difficult or dangerous situation that needs serious attention.”  I think the most important part of the definitions is “needs serious attention”.  A crisis is something that is out of the ordinary and severe.  It is a major event that causes significant disruption in the life of the person experiencing it.  Most people associate the word crisis with negative events but a crisis can be good or bad.  Finding out you are having twins instead of a single child is a crisis, but a happy one.  Even though it is a positive occurrence it still causes disruption and it is a serious situation that needs to be dealt with sooner rather than later.

A precipitating event may also be called a precipitation factor.  According to Mosby’s Medical Dictionary via Freedictionary.com, it is “an element that causes or contributes to the occurrence of a disorder” (Mosby).  In other words it is what lead to, or caused, the crisis.  In colloquial language it is the straw that breaks the camel’s back.  It is that thing that, when experienced, causes the person to no longer be able to cope with what they are being put through.  They have exhausted their emotional reserves and have nothing left to fall back on.  This could be any incident from being fired from a job to being teased because they aren’t wearing the “right” shoes.  Once a person’s reserves are depleted, anything, so matter how innocent it may seem to an outsider, can set off a crisis.

 

  1. Describe at least  three  different  categories  of  emergency  situations  and  provide  a  clear

example of each. Please ensure you include a source citation. (minimum 50 words each).

The book On Becoming a Counselor mentions three types of emergency situations, Intrapersonal, Somatic, and Interpersonal (Kennedy, Charles 392).

            An intrapersonal emergency situation arises from internal issues such as depression or anxiety (Kennedy 392).   A suicide attempt is an example of an intrapersonal emergency.  Internal feeling of worthlessness can lead to depression.  This may lead to a person cutting themselves off from support from people who care about them. If the depression is bad enough, it can cause loss of a job which contributes to more feelings of worthlessness and because they have cut themselves off from people that can help them, the increased depression can lead to the suicide attempt.

A somatic emergency arises from a physical symptom or symptoms (Kennedy 392).  I have personal experience with this one.   I had several doctor appointments and even met with a cardiologist for racing heartbeat, shortness of breath, and light headedness.  Every single test came back clear.  Blood pressure and pulse were excellent.  All my scans were great and yet the spells continued day in and day out.  Finally I broke down in my GP’s office.  He started and listing other symptom that fit me to a T.  He stated that it all pointed to anxiety attacks.  I didn’t want to believe it but everything else was good.  I started taking medications and within a month or two they went away.  I think people don’t realize what the physical effects of depression and anxiety can be.  That, along with the stigma that accompanies any kind of mental issues, makes people overlook the mental component of some symptoms, especially if there is no underlying medical problem.

An interpersonal emergency is one that involves others and the way they view and respond to stimulus outside themselves (392). An accident or attack brought on by road rage is an example of this.  A driver is cut off in traffic by another vehicle.  This driver, for whatever reason, sees this as an attack or an insult.  This causes the driver to become angry and aggressive. This may cause them to drive erratically and possibly cause an accident or they may attack the driver that caused the reaction.

 

  1. Describe at least five possible events or situations that may cause an individual to experience a crisis in his or her life. (minimum 100 words)

                There are as many events that may trigger crises as there are people, but there are a few that seem to be somewhat universal.  The first of these we will list, is the death of a loved one.  Any type of loss may trigger not only grief, but a questioning of one’s place in the world and one’s own mortality.  These thoughts can lead to depression and anxiety in some.  This can been seen as a “threat to a basic need” (Kennedy 389) where the basic need is that of affection and socialization.

Another event that may bring about a crisis is being diagnosed with a serious illness or suffering a sudden serious injury.  A person may find themselves dealing with an enormous amount of additional stress without the ability to cope with said stress.  For example, if a person is a hiker and suffers an accident or sustains injuries that take away their ability to walk, that person cannot engage in an activity that brings them joy.   This also takes away their first choice coping mechanism.  The sudden loss may lead to anxiety and depression. This type of crisis may fall under the category of “loss of self-identity or some ability” (389).

Being the victim of a crime is yet another example of an experience that may lead to a personal crisis.  The victimization may lead the person to fear for their safety everywhere they go.  They may suffer panic attacks or lash out in anger while trying to regain a sense of control over their environment.  This type of crisis may be considered as a “challenge to survival” (389).

The breaking up of a relationship is another type of crisis that a person may experience in their lifetime.  Like the death of a loved one, there is a sense of grief and loss, even though the partner is still living.  Feelings of worthlessness, depression and anxiety may follow.  This type of crisis may be seen as a “loss of identity”, “a challenge”, or a “threat to a basic need” (389).

Aging is a natural process that happens to every one of us.  For some, however, it is a very frightening and possibly panic inducing experience.  Not knowing what will happen in the future with regards to illness and infirmity causes a great deal of stress and worry for many.  Like being diagnosed with a serious illness, again can be considered as a “loss of self-identity or some ability” (389).

What I find interesting about the above examples is that, in each case, there is grief involved.  The mourning of a person in the death of a loved one or the breakup of a relationship, the mourning of the sense of security in the case of criminal victimization and the mourning of loss of ability that may come with a serious medical condition and the aging process.  All involve loss and a person learning, or relearning, how to cope with drastic change in how their life going forward.

 

  1. Discuss how an  individual‘s  ability  to  appropriately  cope  and/or  problem  solve  may  be affected by crisis and explain the process you would use to assist this individual. (minimum 100 words).

We all think we know how we will react in a given situation, but there is no definitive way to know for sure unless we have experienced the situation before.  Some people react well.  They keep their wits about them and are able to act rationally and efficiently.  Others don’t.  Two examples of the latter are freezing and panicking.

One of the stereotypical reactions to a crisis is sometimes called the “deer in headlight” phenomenon.  The person freezes.  They are overwhelmed and it is like their body and mind just shut down.  If I were faced with a person who had frozen in the midst of a crisis, I would first make sure they are safe and physically ok.  Shock can set in so a blanket or a coat draped around them to prevent that from happening.  If they are standing, I would try to get them to sit.   Then I would gradually try to get them to move consciously.  Maybe have them hold someone’s hand, watch something, or just pay attention to their breathing.  It wouldn’t be anything critical or a large task, just something to get them out of their head and back to the present (167).

The second type is the opposite of the first.  This is the “run around like a chicken with their head cut off” phenomenon.  These people are also overwhelmed, but instead of doing nothing they try to do everything all at once.  They take too much action.  In this case I would once again try to assign a small task.  Get them to focus on one simple thing instead of trying to solve everything at once (167).

In either case, I believe it is important to be a facilitator only (Kennedy 167).  My purpose would be to help the person get to a point that they can start to plan what steps need to be taken to first, and most importantly, to get out of the immediate situation, but then begin also to look rationally into the future (168).  Basically, I would try to help them regain at least a sense of control and get their rational mind working again (167).

 

  1. List and discuss at least five suicide warning signs. Explain how you would respond if you were assisting an individual exhibiting one or more of these signs. (minimum 50 words each warning sign and minimum 100 words for response).

                There are many warning signs for suicide.  Kevin Caruso lists several in his article “Suicide Warning Signs”.  We will examine five of them below.

The first sign is one that that is fairly well known: Giving away prized possessions (Suicide Warning Signs). This involves a person giving away things that mean a great deal to them and that they would normally never dream of parting with.  It is almost as if the person, knowing that they will not be around to continue taking care of these precious things, feels the need to make sure someone will act in their stead.

Another sign is a dramatic personality change (Suicide Warning Signs). Everyone has mood swings, and usually they are the result of the normal ebb and flow of everyday existence but sometimes, especially if they are extreme, they can be an indication of something deeper and darker.   If the person was once quiet and shy, they may start to act out and behave recklessly.  If, on the other hand, the person is normally outgoing, they may become detached and isolate themselves from people.

A third sign is a change in habits (Suicide Warning Signs). As with the personality changes, this is not something such as starting to eat healthier or beginning a meditation practice.  These changes are much more severe and generally not for the better.  For example: A teetotaler may start drinking heavily or a regular gym go-er may stop going and instead, stay at home and watch TV.

Fourth, and one that may resemble personality and habit change, a person who is thinking of suicide may no longer feel happy when doing activities they previously enjoyed (Suicide Warning Signs). If a person once found solace in music, it will not have the same uplifting effect.  If baseball made happy, they would find games dull and boring.  It would seem that nothing could bring joy to them any longer.

Finally, the person may feel like there is no way out of whatever situation they find themselves in (Suicide Warning Signs). This is complete hopelessness and total lack of any kind of hope.  They either cannot see a resolution at all, or the only resolution they see is so overwhelmingly negative that death is preferable.

Deciding how to react to some exhibiting warning signs for suicide is a tricky and delicate thing. You have to be aware of their current state and think very carefully about the consequences of your actions.  You don’t want to overreach or make them feel worse but, at the same time you want to make sure that they get the help they need (Kennedy 352).

If I notice a change in habit or personality in someone I know, I would first start with general inquiries like “How are you” or “Missed you at (whatever activity I hadn’t seen them at).” This would allow me to see if there is another reason for the changes such as an illness, injury, change in employment schedule, etc.  If none of these more benign things, I would press a bit more, but not to hard. Maybe invite them to an alternate activity.  I would definitely follow up with them often (Caruso  How to Help a Suicidal Person).

If someone came to me and stated that they felt trapped and hopeless, that they found no joy in life, or they tried to give me something that I know they would never part with, I would ask how long they had felt that way, and if they had talked to anyone about it. I would listen and/or stay with them if they wanted to talk to me, but I would also make sure that they knew of some resources in our area that may be able to help them better than I can.  I would also follow up to see how they are doing and if they sought help from professional resources.  If things deteriorated while they were talking I would call Emergency services to have them admitted to the hospital (How to Help a Suicidal Person).

If a person told me flat out that they were going to kill themselves or that they had done something such as taken pills, I would call 911 and get emergency services on the way (How to Help a Suicidal Person).

6.   Choose four of the seven common misconceptions about suicide from the list below and discuss why each is a misconception. (minimum 50 words each)

Unfortunately the topic of suicide not only has an enormous stigma attached to it, people also have many misconceptions.  We will explore four of them in the paragraphs below.

People who talk about suicide won‘t really do it.

Someone talking about committing suicide is a serious issue. In contrast to what some people think, the person is probably seriously considering taking their own life. The fact that they are speaking about may be the first indication that they are serious.  They may have been thinking about it for a while and speaking the worlds may be an indicator that they have finally decided to do it.  Stating the intention to take their own life may also be a help seeking behavior. They may absolutely want someone to help them or get them help. It doesn’t hurt to check in and follow up with a person who has threatened suicide (Caruso Suicide Myths).

Anyone who tries to kill himself/herself must be crazy.

First let’s define what “crazy” means in this instance.  Usually this is thought of as hearing voices, hallucinating, being unkempt, talking to one’s self, and generally behaving like an extra in a bad B movie version of a psyche ward.  The reality is anyone can be depressed, anxious, or contemplating suicide even if they seem to be “perfectly normal”.  This goes back to the stigma that is attached to, not just suicide, but any perceived mental illness.  Most mental issues such as depression and anxiety are, in fact, physical.  They involve the chemistry in the human brain malfunctioning.  Medication and counseling both go a long way to assisting people with these disorders.  Assuming that someone who looks and acts ok is just a little sad can be a dangerous thing.  Some of the most depressed people have actually learned to fool others into thinking they are happy and healthy.  Robin Williams immediately comes to mind.  He was funny, clever and seemed to be extremely happy, and yet felt his only recourse was suicide.  You should never assume what a person is feeling by the way they look or how happy they act (Suicide Myths).

If a person is determined to kill himself/herself, nothing is going to stop him/her.

Sometimes all it takes to stop someone from taking their own life is for someone they love and trust to ask them what is wrong and how they can help.  Sometimes a struggling person just needs one person to show them that there is something worth hanging on for. Most often it is not a grand gesture, but the small everyday acts of listening and just being there for someone, that makes the most difference (Suicide Myths).

Once the emotional crisis improves, the risk of suicide is over.

Just because someone has decided to not take their life today doesn’t mean the work is done.  It is a decision that has to be made over and over, day after day.  Hopefully the person is receiving counseling and has met with a doctor to evaluate any the physical issues.  Continued counseling can help the person learn new coping skills as well as give them a person to talk to when things get bad.  Medication, if required, can also be helpful by equalizing the chemical imbalance in the brain.  Both counseling and medication are continuing treatments even if the main stressor is resolved (Suicide Myths).

 

  1. Discuss why an individual in crisis might seek an ADF clergy person for help and explain whether or not you feel this is an appropriate function for ADF clergy, why or why not? (minimum 200 words)

                Why would a person seek out an ADF clergy member instead of a professional when in the middle of a crisis?  There are a few reasons. One, they may feel more comfortable talking to a spiritual leader, especially if this is the first time they have talked to anyone about the issue.  There may be a sense of “I feel dumb going to a counselor because it may not be real” and talking to a clergy member may help them put their feelings and thoughts in order so that they can feel comfortable making an appointment. As long as the clergy member knows the limits of their abilities and knows when and how to appropriately refer the person to a professional, I see no problem with this scenario.

Another reason may be that the person is unsure of local resources.  If a person doesn’t know who, specifically can help them, they may turn to a clergy member because they are seen as a source of information for the community.  This scenario is definitely within the purvue of an ADF clergy member.  Having this kind of information on hand and available should anyone need it is an excellent way to help the members of the community.

Another scenario may be that a person does not have the means to pay for professional counseling and is hoping to receive services for free.  This is a dangerous road to travel.  The clergy member can offer to help the person find a professional that may be willing to work at a reduced rate, and certainly listen but should not try to offer those types of professional services themselves.  As ADF clergy, most of us are neither trained nor licensed as therapists or counselors and may do more harm than good should we try to perform beyond our capabilities.

 

  1. Discuss an example of a crisis situation to which you have responded (this may be a crisis you have personally experienced or an experience in which you tried to help someone else in crisis). Reflect upon your response to the crisis in your example, and explain what you found effective, as well as how you could have improved your response to this situation. (minimum 200 words)

                Not too long ago a friend of mine was diagnosed with epilepsy.  It came on suddenly.  Her first seizure occurred at work and took us all by surprise.  During the course of the seizure, she received a concussion and a strained shoulder.   At first the doctors thought it may have been a reaction to a new medication she was on, but then it happened again.  For the next several weeks, a battery of test were run, trying to figure out what was going on.  And then they diagnosis came:  Epilepsy.  The doctors started her on different combinations of drugs to stop the seizures. It took months to find the right one.  During this time she was not allowed to drive and would not be able to until she had been seizure free for quite a while.  Looking at a computer screen when she was tires would trigger absence seizures, so she ended up losing her job because she could no longer maintain the work volume.

Luckily she already had a great support system and good doctors.  My role was a set of sharp ears and soft shoulders.  I was someone that she could go to and talk about her frustrations.  She knew that I did Reiki, so one evening she and her husband came over and I did a Reiki healing session.  I made sure she was aware that this wouldn’t cure her but it may help her relax, and it did.  She said that just having the warmth of the hands and not having to do anything but lie down and relax was comforting.

She is also an animal lover, I asked her to check in on my cat when I was away for a weekend.  Cats don’t really need to be checked on in that short of a time frame, but it gave her a sense of normalcy and even though it may not be scientifically proven, the healing power of fuzzy cuddly animals is amazing.  To sum up, I listened, helped her relax and gave her a task that she would enjoy and remind her that she could still do a lot of things she “normally” did even though she had a lot of restrictions and there were still a lot of questions about how her future would go.   Luckily she already had wonderful coping skills and a great support system as well as having medical care from the beginning.  All of that allowed me to just be support although I think if I had it all over again I would have visited her at home more often instead of communication via phone and email.

 

  1. Discuss how the  skills  required  of  ADF  clergy  in  ritual,  especially  those  which  involve mitigating chaos  and  generating  order,  might  relate  to  those  necessary  for  appropriately responding to an emergency situation (minimum 100 words).

                In a crisis order is in short supply and there is an abundance of chaos and the ability to provide more order and lessen the amount of chaos is sorely needed.  There are several skills that and ADF clergy member needs in ritual that will also be valuable for doing just that.

First, a clergy member needs to be able to anchor or ground themselves.  I do this with the Two Powers meditation.  When this is done properly, a person can become a calm solid presence.  They are able to push the chaos out of their minds so they can focus.  This leads to the second item; the ability to have an overall view.

In ritual, a clergy member needs to make sure that people are fulfilling their active duties like hallowing the center, opening the gates and making offerings as well as how those that are not actively taking part in the ritual are reacting to that flow.  The clergy member knows how the pieces should fit together and how the ritual should flow.  If something goes awry, the clergy member can take a breath, take stock of the situation and change and things accordingly.

In a crisis situation, this ability will allow the clergy member to take stock of the situation without panicking and/or jumping to conclusions.  If the crisis occurs in a group setting, it also allows them to see how others are reacting and responding, or not, to the situation.

Third, in the course of a ritual the clergy member needs to be able to direct or cue others to do certain tasks. They must be able to do this clearly and concisely with no misunderstanding so that the ritual will run as it should. In a crisis this is extremely important.   Emotions are riding high and if instructions aren’t made perfectly clear and specific, the actions may not be carried out.  An example of this is pointing at specific person and telling them to call 911 instead of just yelling “Call 911” and hoping someone does.

 

  1. Compile and submit a list of mainstream resources providing crisis services available in your locality. Additionally, explore your locality for a hotline number to access emergency services and discuss the results of your search. (Please provide the following information for each resource listed a) name of resource b) contact information c) how to make a referral d) hours of operation  e)  specific  service[s]  provided  by  the  resource).  (no  minimum  word  count)

               

I have listed them by category in overview form. The details for each resource are listed on individual info sheets that I created.  Those sheets begin on page 8.

 

                General Emergency Services

                                911

                Suicidal thoughts

National Suicide Hotline

Oaklawn

Elkhart General Hospital

Mental illness

Oaklawn

Substance abuse (addiction)

                Oaklawn

Financial issues

Church Community Services

Homelessness

Faith Mission

Elkhart County Health Department

Food Bank of Northern Indiana

Suspected abuse of the individual‘s child(ren)

CAPS (Child and Adult Protective Services

CPS (Child Protective Services)

Criminal victimization (*assuming this is after the fact and not during the criminal act)

Victims Assistance Services

AARDVARC

Grief

                Center for Hospice Care

Ryan’s Place

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

National Suicide Hotline

 

Contact Information:

1-800-273-8255

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

 

How to make a referral:

Call

Go to website and do an electronic referral

 

Hours of Operation

24 hours

 

Service provided

Someone to talk to

Resources for those who are suicidal as well as those that want to help

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Elkhart County Health Department

 

Contact Information:

www.ElkhartCountyHealth.org

574-523-2283

877-523-2283

 

How to make a referral:

Call

 

Hours of Operation

Monday: 10-2 and 3-7

Tuesday and Thursday: 8:30 – 12:30 and 1-5

Friday: 8:30 – 12:30

 

 

Service provided

WIC

Children’s Dental Services

Adult and Children Immunizations

 

 


Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Center for Hospice Care

 

Contact Information:

800-467-7423

 

How to make a referral:

Call

 

Hours of Operation

24 Hours

 

Service provided

Free grief counseling for adults and children within area

 

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Oaklawn

 

Contact Information:

800-282-0809

http://www.Oaklawn.org

 

How to make a referral:

Call – they have Spanish speakers on staff

 

Hours of Operation

8-5 but they have 24 hour emergency admissions

 

Service provided

Addiction treatment and counseling

Residential treatment (Children and adult)

Inpatient and Outpatient treatments for depression, bipolar schizophrenia, addiction, and other

mental issues

Foster and Adoption programs

Individual and group counseling

Family Therapy

Skills training

Counseling and Treatment for repeat youth offenders

Amish Specific Treatments

Serious mental issue case management-both residential and outpatient.

               

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Church Community Services

 

Contact Information:

574-295-6373

churchcommunityservices.org

 

How to make a referral:

Call

Hours of Operation

Financial Assistance

Monday – Thursday 9 AM-11:45 AM  &  1 PM-3:45 PM

 

Friday – by appointment only

Food Pantry

Monday – 11 AM-3 PM

Tuesday – 11 AM-3 PM and 4 PM-7 PM

Wednesday – 11 AM-3 PM

Thursday – 11 AM-3 PM, 4 PM-7 PM

Friday – 11 AM-3 PM

 

 

Service provided

Grants and financial assistance for utilities, medication and other financial needs

Food Pantry: Individuals and families from Elkhart County with income below 185% of the Federal poverty guide who need food are eligible to come shop for free groceries up to once every 30 days.

 


 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Victim Assistance Services

 

Contact Information:

574-523-2237

http://www.elkhartcountyprosecutor.com/victim-assistance/contact-us

How to make a referral          

Call or online

 

Hours of Operation

Monday 8 – 5

Tuesday – Friday 8 – 4

Closed between noon and 1

 

Service provided

Will liaise between victim and prosecutor and law enforcement to provide updates

Can make referrals to other agencies that may be able to help

Someone to talk to

 

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

AARDVARC (An Abuse, Rape, Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection)

 

Contact Information:

http://www.aardvarc.org

 

How to make a referral:

Hours of Operation

24 hours

Service provided

An online list of resources for victims and helpers


 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

CAPS (Child and Parent Services)

 

Contact Information:

574 266-2401

 

How to make a referral:

Call

Hours of Operation

 8 – 4:30

 

Service provided

Crisis Nursery

Court appointed Advocated for abused and neglected children

Parenting classes

Neutral location for interviewing children

Neutral and safe place for parent/child visitation

               

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

CPS (Child Protective Services)

Contact Information:

Hotline: 1 800 800-5556

 

How to make a referral:

Call

 

Hours of Operation

24 hours

 

Service provided

Investigates reports of abuse and neglect

 


 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Food Bank of Northern Indiana

 

Contact Information:

(574) 232-9986

 

How to make a referral:

Call, visit

Hours of Operation

8-4:30

 

Service provided

Provides food for financially at risk seniors.

Provides food for school-age children during school breaks when they would not have access to food.

Mobile food pantries

               

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Ryan’s Place

 

Contact Information:

574-535-1000

 

How to make a referral:

Call

Hours of Operation

8:30 – 4:40

Service provided

Grief counseling for children, teens and their families


 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

United Way 211

 

Contact Information:

Web: http://www.myunitedway2-1-1.org

Phone: 211

How to make a referral:

Hours of Operation

24 hours

Service provided

List of resources, services and general information

 

Crisis Response Resource Info Sheet

 

Name of Resource:

Faith Mission

 

Contact Information:

574-293-3406

 

How to make a referral:

Call

 

Hours of Operation:

24 hours

 

Service provided:

Provides emergency shelter and food for the homeless

Long term residential program

Life skills training.

 

WORKS CITED

 

“About”. http://www.oaklawn.org/services#.VhrS7LVzOJk. Oaklawn. 2014. Web. 8/5/2015

“About”. http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/about/overview.aspx. np.nd. Web. 8/5/2015

“About US”. http://www.centerforhospice.org/About-Us. Center for Hospice Care. 2015. Web.

8/20/2015

“About Us”. http://thefaithmission.org/about-us. Faith Mission. 2014. Web. 8/14/2015

Caruso, Kevin. “Suicide Warning Signs”. http://suicide.org/suicide-warning-signs.html Suicide.Org. nd.

Web. 8/5/2015

Caruso, Kevin. “Suicide Warning Signs”. http://suicide.org/suicide-myths.html Suicide.Org. nd.

Web. 11/23/2015

Caruso, Kevin. “Suicide Warning Signs”. http://suicide.org/how-to-help-a-suicidal-person.html

Suicide.Org. nd. Web. 11/23/2015

“Child Protective Services”. http://www.in.gov/dcs/2398.htm State of Indiana. Nd. Web. 8/14/2015

“Contact” http://ryansplace.org/programs/. Np. nd. Web, 8/14/2015

“Crisis”. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crisis 2015. Merriam-Webster, Inc. 2015. Web. 7/31/2015

“Financial Services”. http://churchcommunityservices.org/services/financial-services/. Web. 8/5/2015

“Food Pantry”.  http://churchcommunityservices.org/services/client-choice-food-pantry/. Web.

8/5/2015

“Free Walk-In Meals”. http://thefaithmission.org/free-walk-meals. Faith Mission. 2014. Web. 8/14/2015

“Healthy Beginnings”.Elkhartcountyhealth.org. Elkhart County Health Department. 2015. Web.

8/14/2015

“Home page” http://www.aardvarc.org/. np. 3/3/2011. Web. 10/2/2015

“Home page”. www.Myunitedway2-1-1.org. United Way of Allen County. 2015. Web. 10/2/2015

Kennedy, Eugene, and Sara Charles. On Becoming A Counselor, Revised Edition: A Basic Guide

for Nonprofessional Counselors and Other Helpers. Crossroad Classic, 2001. Print.

“Precipitating factor.” Mosby’s Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. Elsevier. 2009.

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/precipitating+factor. Web. 8/5/2015

“Programs”. http://www.capselkhart.org/programs. CAPS.  2015.  Web. 8/14/2015

“Programs”. http://feedindiana.org/programs. Food Bank of Northern Indiana2002-2015. Web.

8/20/2015

“Programs”. http://ryansplace.org/programs/.  Np. nd.                 Web. 8/14/2015

”Refferals”. http://www.oaklawn.org/services#.VhrS7LVzOJk. Oaklawn. 2014. Web. 8/5/2015

“Resident Services”. http://thefaithmission.org/resident-services. Faith Mission. 2014. Web. 8/14/2015

“Services”. http://www.oaklawn.org/services#.VhrS7LVzOJk. Oaklawn. 2014. Web. 8/5/2015

“Shelter”. http://thefaithmission.org/shelter. Faith Mission. 2014. Web. 8/14/2015

“Victims’s Assitance”. http://www.elkhartcountyprosecutor.com/programs-services/victim-assistance.

Office of the Prosecuting Attorney. 2013 Web. 10/2/2015.

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